THE FIRST PROOF
Every experience has a visual and experiential representation through photography, illustration, product, video, digital, and physical environments. THE FIRST PROOF is another look at the formation of these experiences, focusing equally on creation and creator. It serves as an analysis of the creative inputs and outputs, and its influence.

Observations on fashion, art, design, and creativity. 

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Thursday
Oct052017

#TBT: Robert Longo & Bottega Veneta F ’10, Art of Collaboration

thefirstproof#TBT - Robert Longo & Bottega Veneta F ’10, Art of Collaboration. “I have always admired the strength and individuality of Robert Longo’s ‘Men In The Cities’ images. This collection, with its dark palette and emphasis on line and movement, seemed well-suited to his graphic approach.” - @tomasmaier@bottegaveneta.

#fashion #art #advertising #artoffashion#creativeinspiration #bottegaveneta #robertlongo

 

Robert Longo (born January 7, 1953) is an American painter and sculptor. Mr. Longo became a rising star in the 1980s for his "Men in the Cities" series, which depicted sharply dressed men and women writhing in contorted emotion. Mr. Longo uses graphite like clay, molding it to create images like the writhing, dancing figures in his seminal "Men in the Cities" series. For that series, Mr. Longo photographed his friends lurching backward, collapsing forward or sprawled on invisible pavement. After enlarging the pictures through a projector, he and an artist assistant drew them in sizes ranging from three-quarter scale to larger than life-size. In the process, Longo often dramatized poses and always standardized attire into quite formal, black-and-white clothing.

Working on themes of power and authority, Mr. Longo produced a series of blackened American flags ("Black Flags" 1989–91) as well as oversized hand guns ("Bodyhammers" 1993–95). From 1995 to 1996 he worked on his "Magellan" project, 366 drawings (one per day) that formed an archive of the artist's life and surrounding cultural images. "Magellan" was followed by 2002's "Freud Drawings", which reinterpreted Edmund Engelman's famous documentary images of Sigmund Freud's flat, moments before his flight from the Nazis. In 2002 and 2004 he presented "Monsters", Bernini-esque renderings of massive breaking waves and "The Sickness of Reason", baroque renderings of atomic bomb blasts. "Monsters" was included in the 2004 Whitney Biennial.

Read More: https://www.robertlongo.com/

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